619.800.8478

News

Page 1 of 812345»
...

July 2014 Latest DesktopServer Videos

Our two most recent videos are both about deploying your locally-developed site to a live environment:

First up, is How to Deploy a DesktopServer Site to Flywheel. Flywheel is a managed hosting server, that specializes in high speed, highly reliable WordPress sites, but their proprietary server configuration require a few additional steps to the Direct Deploy process.

In this video, we show you how to take your locally created WordPress site and use DesktopServer Premium to deploy to FlyWheel’s managed server.

Our second video is How To Deploy Your DesktopServer Site to a Live Host In a Subdirectory. Most WordPress installations are either in a top-level domain (such as example.com), or in a subdomain (subdomain.example.com). WordPress can be installed in a subdirectory (such as example.com/site/), but if you want to deploy a locally developed site to a subdirectory, there are a few additional steps that must be taken. This video shows you how.

Be sure to check out all of our other videos, and subscribe to our Youtube channel for more!

July 2014 Tips & Tricks

Whether you’re deploying a site from your local environment to the live server, or pulling a live site down to local, there are some plugins that just seem to get in the way of a smooth migration.

Caching – Common examples of caching plugins are W3 Total Cache and WP Super Cache. These plugins save server load by creating a static file version of your site to deliver to web users, rather than having them dynamically generated on each page view.

If you use any of these plugins, here are some steps to take before moving a site from live to local, or the other way around):

  • Deactivate the plugin in question.

  • Delete the “cache” folder (this is usually somewhere in wp-content, but might also be in the root directory of WordPress)

  • Check your wp-config.php for any lines added by the plugin and remove them.

Any plugin that creates a cached version of files on the site should be deactivated before moving the site. Not doing so can cause the site to be broken in its new location until the plugin is deactivated and the cache is cleared.

Jetpack – Jetpack brings a ton of great features of WordPress.com to your self-hosted WordPress site. Many of its features, though, rely on a connection to WordPress.com in order to function. Before downloading a live site to your local environment, you’ll want to deactivate Jetpack so it doesn’t try to connect the local version to WordPress.com.

To develop locally with Jetpack, you can add define( ‘JETPACK_DEV_DEBUG’, true); to the wp-config.php file. This disables the connection to WordPress.com, while allowing you to use all of the features that don’t rely on the external connection.

Hide My WP – This plugin claims to help prevent hackers getting into your site by hiding or changing the WordPress file structure. The wp-admin, plugins, and upload urls  (and many others) are all changed or removed. DesktopServer relies on the standard file structure being present, so make sure to deactivate this (or any similar) plugin before pulling a live site to local.

Coming Soon/Maintenence – There are a ton of plugins out there that will display a “Coming Soon” or other maintenance message, or otherwise hides the site from view of users that aren’t logged into the site. Before deploying, you’ll want to make sure these plugins are deactivated, as they will cause the deploy to fail if they are turned on. Also, if you’re using a “.maintenance” file to hide the site, you’ll want to delete/rename it. If you need the site to be hidden once deployed, simply reactivate your plugin or add back the “.maintenance” file.

Latest DesktopServer Videos

Our two most recent videos are both about deploying your locally-developed site to a live environment:

First up, is How to Deploy a DesktopServer Site to Flywheel. Flywheel is a managed hosting server, that specializes in high speed, highly reliable WordPress sites, but their proprietary server configuration require a few additional steps to the Direct Deploy process.

In this video, we show you how to take your locally created WordPress site and use DesktopServer Premium to deploy to FlyWheel’s managed server.

Our second video is How To Deploy Your DesktopServer Site to a Live Host In a Subdirectory. Most WordPress installations are either in a top-level domain (such as example.com), or in a subdomain (subdomain.example.com). WordPress can be installed in a subdirectory (such as example.com/site/), but if you want to deploy a locally developed site to a subdirectory, there are a few additional steps that must be taken. This video shows you how.

Be sure to check out all of our other videos, and subscribe to our Youtube channel for more!

Have you run into any other plugins that cause issues? Let us know in the comments!

Upcoming WordCamps

Here at ServerPress, we love going to WordCamps. They’re a unique way to learn more about the software more than 20% of websites run on, and join in on one of the best open source communities out there.

This summer has been an action-packed WordCamp season. We’ve been to places like Minneapolis and Miami, from Seattle to Chicago. But that doesn’t mean we’re stopping yet!

If you want to catch us at a WordCamp near you, here are the upcoming WordCamps that we’re planning on attending:

WordCamp Milwaukee – July 25-27: Marc Benzakein will be there to present a business talk on customer service for clients, and how to deal with the times when customer interactions don’t go as expected. Be sure to stop by our sponsor booth to say hi!

WordCamp NYC – August 2-3, 2014: In addition to sponsoring, our very own Marc Benzakein will be presenting at the WordPress 101 workshop on the WordPress Dashboard.

WordCamp Omaha – August 9-10, 2014: Serverpress, LLC is proud to be sponsoring the First Annual WordCamp Omaha. Marc Benzakein will be speaking there, where he revisits the subject of developing locally and its advantages. If you’re in the area, be sure to come out and support what is appearing to be a fantastic WordCamp while learning a ton and meeting great people!

WordCamp San Francisco – October 25-26: It’s early yet, so our plans for WordCamp SF are still up in the air, but we definitely plan on being there. Be sure to follow their site to see when speakers and sponsors are announced!

Let us know on twitter @DesktopServer if you’re planning on attending any of these events, and don’t forget to stop by and say hello!

How to Deploy a DesktopServer Site to Flywheel

Flywheel is a managed hosting server, that specializes in high speed, highly reliable WordPress sites, but their proprietary server configuration require a few additional steps to the Direct Deploy process.

In this video, we show you how to take your locally created WordPress site and use DesktopServer Premium to deploy to FlyWheel’s managed server.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBNs_RhSVEE

Be sure to check out all of our other videos, and subscribe to our Youtube channel for more!

How To Deploy Your DesktopServer Site to a Live Host In a Subdirectory.

Most WordPress installations are either in a top-level domain (such as example.com), or in a subdomain (subdomain.example.com). WordPress can be installed in a subdirectory (such as example.com/site/), but if you want to deploy a locally developed site to a subdirectory, there are a few additional steps that must be taken. This video shows you how.

Be sure to check out all of our other videos, and subscribe to our Youtube channel for more!

WordCamp Chicago

Last month, ServerPress’ Marc Benzakein was down in The Windy City for WordCamp Chicago 2014. He presented “There’s no place like 127.0.0.1,” a workshop about how to avoid breaking your live site by developing locally.

If you weren’t able to make it to Chicago this time around, the video of Marc’s presentation is available on WordPress.tv.

Marc’s presentation was part of Foundation Friday, an amazing addition to the traditional 1-2 day WordCamp. Foundation Friday was broken up by user level, 101, 201, 301, and 401. The 101 track introduced new users to the wonders of WordPress. 201 was for users already familiar with WordPress looking to get more out of their sites. The 301 sessions introduced advanced users to theme and plugin development, and the 401 session was an all-day unconference for advanced developers to share their mojo with each other.

Saturday and Sunday featured more traditional WordCamp sessions, but that doesn’t mean they weren’t awesome. The videos are still in the process of being posted, so be sure to keep an eye on http://wordpress.tv/event/wordcamp-chicago-2014/ as they keep coming!

If you haven’t been to a WordCamp, what are you waiting for? They’re a great opportunity to become involved in one of the best open source communities around. And you might learn something, too! If you live anywhere near a major city, there should be a WordCamp near you at some point. Check out the schedule on WordCamp Central to find a WordCamp near you. Even if you have to travel a bit, the experience will be like nothing else you’ve ever seen!

Building a Blueprint with Underscores and Foundation

bp.pngOne of DesktopServer’s most powerful premium features is building a Blueprint. Blueprints allow you to create a custom default installation for your local development sites. If you always start a new site with a particular theme framework or starter theme, creating a Blueprint can save a ton of time by pre-installing it for you when you create a new development site.

A popular starter theme is Underscores (also called _s), which features very little CSS, but all of the powerful features of any WordPress theme. This allows you to save many hours of development time by not having to hand-code every feature of a WordPress theme.

Zurb’s Foundation does the same thing for the design side of things. It features a CSS framework that is mobile-ready and takes a lot of the work out of setting up the layout of your site.

Combining Underscores and Foundation in a DesktopServer Blueprint gives you a power-house development suite that can save thousands of hours on new sites.

To create the Blueprint, you’ll first need to create a new blank WordPress Installation using DesktopServer to use as the basis for the Blueprint. First, open up DesktopServer, and Start the Apache & MySQL services if they aren’t already running, and click Next.

Then, select “Create a new development site,” and click Next. Name the new website, and be sure to take note of the directory WordPress will be installed in. Then, click next.

DesktopServer will now create the database and host entries for the new site. Once that is completed, click the link to go to the new WordPress installation and follow the prompts to run the WordPress installation.

Once WordPress is installed, log into your WordPress installation and run the WordPress update if one is available.

Next, you’ll need to download Underscores and Foundation. Go to http://underscores.me, enter a new theme name in the box, and click “Generate.” You can also download/fork the theme from Github.

Once it’s downloaded, uzip and install the theme in your WordPress directory under /wp-content/themes/.

To get Foundation, go to http://foundation.zurb.com/, click the “Download Foundation 5” button, and click the download button for the version of Foundation that you want to use.

Copy the files from the Foundation archive into your Underscores-based theme’s directory. You’ll need to create a subdirectory called “foundation” to put the files in.

Add the following to your theme’s functions.php to enqueue the Foundation styles and scripts (code assumes foundation is in a subdirectory):

function enqueue_foundation() {
    /* Add Foundation CSS */
    wp_enqueue_style( 'foundation-normalize', get_stylesheet_directory_uri() . '/foundation/css/normalize.css' );
    wp_enqueue_style( 'foundation', get_stylesheet_directory_uri() . '/foundation/css/foundation.css' );
    wp_enqueue_script( 'foundation-js', get_template_directory_uri() . '/foundation/js/foundation.min.js', array( 'jquery' ), '5', true );
    }
add_action( 'wp_enqueue_scripts', 'enqueue_foundation' );
/* Add Foundation footer */
function foundation_footer(){
    ?>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        jQuery(document).ready(function($) {
            $(document).foundation();
        });
    </script>
    <?php
}
add_filter('wp_footer','foundation_footer');

After you’ve installed the theme and made the code changes, activate the theme in the WordPress dashboard. Now it’s time to create the Blueprint!

From the main menu of DesktopServer, select “Export, import or share a website,” and click Next. From there, select “Export or deploy a WordPress website,” click Next, and select the name of the local development environment you just created. Give the new Blueprint a name in the “Export as” field, select “Export to a website archive (.zip file), and click Next.

On the next screen, simply click Next, leaving the database and server information blank. Verify that the filename for your archive is what you want, click Browse, and navigate to your Blueprints directory. On Windows, this can be found at C:\xampplite\blueprints\ and on Mac OS X, the location is \Applications\XAMPP\blueprints. Once you’ve located the directory, click Next.

Now, DesktopServer will create your Blueprint archive. Once it’s completed, click Next. To use your new Blueprint, select “Create a new development website” and click next. Select your newly created Blueprint, give your site a new name, choose the location to install your site (it’s not recommended to install it in your \blueprints\ directory). and click Create.

From there, just follow the steps to create the site and install WordPress as outlined above. Once the site has finished installing, you can log into the site. You’ll see that your base theme is already installed and ready for you to start creating!

Don’t forget to check out our video on creating a Blueprint with DesktopServer on Youtube.

For more information on working with Underscores and Foundation, see the video of our friend Steve Zehngut’s WordCamp OC presentation, Build a WordPress Theme with Foundation and Underscores.

How to Deploy Your Locally Created Website to a Subdirectory on a Live Host

The method we recommend for setting up a live hosting environment is to either use a top level domain such as .com, .org, .gov etc, or to use a subdomain where you would use a differentiating word prior to the top level domain (domainname.com, subdomain.domainname.com). However, there may be a time that you find yourself in need of deploying your locally developed site to a subdirectory instead. A subdirectory installation is when you have created an installation in a directory beneath your top level domain (domainname.com/subdirectory). While DesktopServer’s direct deploy method can work in these instances, it requires that the live site directory structure is identical to that of your local environment and that WordPress is installed in the Top Level Domain. Sometimes, this is not the case. In the video tutorial and instructions, we show you how to take a locally developed WordPress website created with DesktopServer and deploy it to a subdirectory on your live domain.

For those of you that would like step by step directions, we have included those as well:

  1. Create WordPress 1-click install
  2. Install to subdirectory of choice
  3. Note database name
  4. Verify that Database Table Prefix matches local prefix table
  5. Verify installation
  6. Delete wp-content directory and all its contents in newly created WordPress subdirectory
  7. Start DesktopServer
  8. Export your local site to an archive
  9. In Export As field, enter top level domain name or subdomain only. Do not enter subdirectory
  10. Select Customize Scrubbing Options (!important)
  11. Change “Replace With” field to have /subdirectory name in the scrubbing options
  12. Open archive
  13. copy database.sql to a file location of your choice (note location in which you stored the file)
  14. FTP local wp-content file to live WordPress subdirectory
  15. On Host, click on phpMyAdmin
  16. Select the database of the new WordPress installation.
  17. Delete all tables in database
  18. Import locally stored database.sql that was extracted from newly created archive
  19. Check to be sure site works
  20. Re-save permalinks
Tagged , ,

Unsupported Goods and Services

From time to time we run into a service or product that, despite all of our efforts, just does not play well with DesktopServer. Because our goal is to provide all of our Members with top-notch service, we have to make the hard decision to no longer support these products because they take up so much time with Support that we cannot service other customers.

These products will be listed here and as the list is constantly changing, we highly recommend you check back often.

Read more »

New DesktopServer Version 3.6.2 Released

A new version of DesktopServer (version 3.6.2) is now available. While we are actively working on our next major release of version 4.0, we have decided to push out a small update that takes care of a few issues with previous versions of DesktopServer.

Read more »

Page 1 of 812345»
...
Notices
  • WordPress is a registered trademark of the WordPress Foundation. serverpress.com is neither affiliated nor endorsed by the WordPress Foundation. serverpress.com and the serverpress.com logo is a trademark of ServerPress, LLC.
Contact Us

Tel: 619 800 8478
Email: support@serverpress.com

facebook  Google Plus Circle  Delicious Discover  Technorati Favorite  Recommend on StumbleUpon  Submit to Digg  RSS feed